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Stefano Bernardi
1577 - 1637
Italy
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S. Bernardi
Stefano Bernardi (1577 - 15/02/1637), an Italian composer and theorist (born in Verona). He was maestro di cappella in Rome and Verona and for the Archduke Carl Joseph before settling in Salzburg in 1624. Primarily a church composer, his style is transitional between the a cappella and concertato styles, the more modern idiom emerging in the motets and psalms of 1613. He wrote a counterpoint treatise (1615) and published books of madrigals and instrumental works for three to six players. The Salmi concertati (1637) are precursors of the solo concerto, contrasting a soprano voice with a four-part ripieno.
Responsoria pro defunctis
Period:Late Renaissance
Musical form:mass
Text/libretto:Latin mass
Label(s):Rosa Classic RDO947
Bernardi was a Italian composer and theorist. He was maestro di cappella in Rome and Verona and for the Archduke Carl Joseph before settling in Salzburg in 1624. Primarily a church composer, his style is transitional between the a cappella and concertato styles, the more modern idiom emerging in the motets and psalms of 1613. He wrote a counterpoint treatise (1615) and published books of madrigals and instrumental works for three to six players. The Salmi concertati (1637) are precursors of the solo concerto, contrasting a soprano voice with a four-part ripieno.
Lux Aeterna; Ein Salzburger Requiem
Period:Late Renaissance
Musical form:mass
Text/libretto:Latin mass
Label(s):Arcana ACAA 470
Bernardi contributed greatly to the integration of the Italian nuovo stile in Salzburg, especially of features such as polychorality and the stile concertato, and may therefore be seen as the musical forefather of later, more famous Salzburg musicians. The outstanding stature of his music is clearly evident from his majestic Requiem, the manuscript of which is still preserved in the Salzburg cathedral archives. Particularly impressive is the Sequentia, which forms the core of the work and opens with an elaborate Dies irae section, based on the famous chant melody. The Requiem, as well as a number of Motets by Bernardi, is recorded here for the very first time.
It contains:
I. Introitus
II. Kyrie eleison
III. Sequentia
IV. Offertorium
V. Sanctus
VI. Agnus Dei
VII. Communio
VIII. Libera me, Domine