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Hernando Franco
1532 - 1585
Spain / Mexico
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H. Franco
Hernando (Fernando) Franco (1532 - 28/11/1585) was a Spanish composer of the Renaissance, who was mainly active in Guatemala and Mexico. Franco was born in Garrovillas, Spain in the region of Extremadura, near the Portuguese border a basic-region for many people who came to the Spanish New World in the 16th century. Franco was during seven years educated in music as a ten years old choir boy at Segovia cathedral by Jerónimo de Espinar (in Avilla present 1552-1558) who may also have been a teacher of Tomás Luis de Victoria. As a young man Hernando Franco met and befriended with Lázaro del Álamo (c.1530-1570) in Espinar, who was to precede him as maestro de capilla in Mexico City.
Most likely Franco went to New World around the 1550s, protected by Sedeño Arévalo, though there is no record of his activities until 1573 when he appears in the records as maestro de capilla of the cathedral of Santiago de Guatemala. Franco left his position in 1574 after a series of budget cuts that affected his salary, and due to a reduction of the choirboys and adults an cuts of theirs salaries. Hernando Franco went to Mexico-City.
The position of maestro de capilla of the new cathedral was vacant (since Juan de Vitoria 1570-1574 left) and Franco was appointed new chapel master in 1575, where his old friend Lázaro del Álamo (c.1530-1570) had been maestro de capilla from 1556 to 1570.
Franco was a well-respected and beloved figure, since he was granted a prebendary in 1581. Franco resigned in 1582 during a period of financial problems in Mexico-City Cathedral. But within two weeks the Bishop pleaded for the return of all musicians. So did Franco. Franco was highly regarded as Chapelmaster. Due to illness Franco could not fulfill his obligations as a teacher of the choirboys. Franco passed away in 1585. Franco was an eminent representative of the vocal arts of the Netherlandish polyphony a school or generations which has a decisive influence on Franco along with the Seville School where he studied. Of course his music can be characterized by a sober austerity, a introvert grandeur and drama with the mystic spirit which surrounds Franco’s music of the Dead.
He wrote about 40 motets which survived and 16 Magnificat-settings, preserved in the Archive of the Cathedral of Mexico City in the so called the Franco Codex, two Masses according to and found in sources in Gutalemala catedral archives, Cathedral of Guatemala (1570-1574) and in Mexico nr 10.
In Libros de polifonía de la Catedral Metropolitana de Mexico nr. 11, books with polyphonic music from the cathedral of México (±1600/1610) (herein 35 of the works are attributed to Franco) and a volume Mexico 2 (end 17th century) and a later volume Mexico 3 (MexCC3, copied 18th century), the Convento de la Encarnación Carmen, Códice del Convento del Carmen/The Carmen Codex, Puebla and in sources in the Newberry Choirbooks in the Library of Chicago (USA). Not all his creations have survived, but at this moment 80 pieces are still preserved.
OFFICIUM DEFUNCTORUM at the time of Franco: Music for the Dead and the Requiem Office we mean the Officium Defunctorum began to set polyphonically in the late fifteenth century. Iberian composers have adopted that practises we only mention Juan Vásquez (c.1510-1560) with his Agenda Defuctorum (1556) and Cristobal de Morales (c.1500-1553) with his Officium Defunctorum and the first Italian Giovanni Mateo Asola (c.1528-1609) with his Officium Defunctorum (1586). We do not forget the Sacrae Lectiones (1560) and Lectiones Sacrae (c.1580) for the Dead set by the Netherlandish Orlando di Lasso (1532-1594). It’s imposing music with real mysticism. Certain is Hernando Franco set on music a great part of Antiphons, Responds, Psalms and a Lecture out of the Officium Defunctorum ad Matutinum primo, secundo and tertio Nocturno. As far as this moment there is no direct evidence he wrote an Officium Defunctorum as a whole. Nevertheless Franco was the first composer in the Spanish New World/America who set polyphonically a great part of the Offices, the Inventory, Antiphons, Responds and Matins Lessons pro defunctis in a different new cultural context. He composed liturgical polyphony for the celebration of the Office of the Dead in the New World. But it is interestingly nearly all pieces (excluded the Respond “Ne recorderis” but see our later remarks below ) of the primo Nocturno have been placed in Book Mexico 11 according to the order of the chants and items in the Office of the Dead. But there is another copied volume (c. 1700) from Mexico, with music for the second and third Nocturnes of Matins of the Dead in a later volume Mexico 2 (17th century). In Libros de Polifonia Mexico 10 is found the “Miserere mei Deus” with nr. 16 and in Libros de Polifonia Mexico 11 is found “Levavi oculus meus” with nr. 21 used in the Ad Vesperas Officium Defunctorum. In the first Newberry Mexican choir-book is found “Qui Lazarum” and “miserere” They all were set in function of the Services. Be aware at that time of Franco’s polyphony - see the files and Chapter acts in Mexico Cathedral - was intended to be performed by a small numbers of singers, two or three per part. Franco's style is related to that of other Spanish composers out of that period, though more conservative, treating dissonance carefully, avoiding virtuosity; tending towards austerity. The voice range of his compositions is limited of course due to the singing abilities of the available choirs. The musical standards were not as high as those in Europe with al large number of well skilled choir-schools all over Europe.
We mention the Manuale sacramentorum secundum usum ecclesiae Mexicanae, 1560 includes a detailed information about the music for the Office of the Dead more specifically the Matins of the Dead. Seen the old Mexican choir-books some Responds change its positions in Mexico-city Services compared to that in the Liber Usualis, the Tridentine Office and the Castillan Liturgy (Seville/Toledo) used in the Old World.
But the two manuscripts Mexico City Cathedral Choirbook 3 and Puebla Cathedral 3 both copied and compiled in the later seventeenth century contains a major inside in the settings used in the New World for the Requiem and Matins of the Dead services.
Nevertheless it is worth and imposing – see below in this site - which compositions can be explicitly attributed to Hernando Franco. At this place we only here mention certain doubtful settings out of the Office of the Dead found in the mention sources in the New World which could be attributed to Franco so we will not do, because that’s to uncertain and not in the spirit of this Website: Ad te Domine levavi animam meam, Psalmus 24; Responde mihi, Lectio IV; Hei mihi Domine, Reponsorium V; Beatus qui intelligit, Psalmus 40; Libera me Domine, Responsorium IX; Jesu redemptor, conclusio.
Author:Wim Goossens
Circumdederunt me doloris mortis I
Period:High Renaissance
Musical form:Motet a 4 vocibus
Text/libretto:Latin from Officium Defunctorum
Duration:1’16”
Text:
R. Circumdederunt me gemitus mortis; dolores inferni circumdederunt me.
Translation:
R. The sorrow of death surrounded me; the pain of hell encompassed me about.
Contributor:Wim Goossens
This Antiphon is used in the Officium Defunctorum ad Matutinum and set by Hernando Franco for four voices (SATB). The Circumdederunt is often especially used by Spanish and Portuguese composers in the Office of the Dead like Cristobal de Morales(c.1500-1553), Pedro Fernandez (1483-1574), Aires Fernandez (16th C.), Juan de Avila ( 16th C.), Hernando Franco (1532-1585), Juan Gutiérrez de Padilla (c.1590-1664), Bartolomeo Trosylho (1500-1567), the German Balthasar de Senarius (c.1485-1544) and even Orlando di Lasso (1532-1594), Jacob Regnart (1540-1599) and William Byrd (1543-1623) did. Settings by Jacobus Clemens and Philippus de Monte have until yet not been judged in this context. As we saw this Antiphon is set by them all as an invitatory Antiphon for the Office of the Dead. On the other hand the interesting plainchant Circumdederunt is often used in chansons, motets, parody masses, elegies and even used in the splendid Requiem Mass by the Jean Richafort (c.1480-c.1547) a composer belonging to the third Netherlandish generation.
This Antiphon is chosen by Hernando Franco as an invitatory antiphon (Motet) used at Matins of the Dead or at the Office of the Dead in the Spanish New World.
This motet Circumdederunt is written in a discrete polyphonic style, but with the plainchant present in a clear way in the Superior. Hernando Franco uses a very short version of the Antiphon of the Inventorium de Officium Defunctorum. The text used by Franco is that earlier used by Cristóbal de Morales (c.1500-1553) in his settings.
The plainchant in the Superior is used at the same musically texture de Morales in his version did. Franco uses some word-painting in “gemitus”, “inferni”, ‘dolores’ and the second “circumdederunt”. This Circumdederunt (I) consists in total out of 18 bars.
This four-part Circumdederunt me, is found and rediscovered in 2002 in Libros de polifonía de la Catedral Metropolitana de Mexico nr. 11, books with polyphonic music in de cathedral of México (± 1600) published in this version with number 34 and in a later volume Mexico 2 ( copied 17th century).
Author:Wim Goossens
Circumdederunt me doloris mortis II
Period:High Renaissance
Musical form:Motet a 4 vocibus
Text/libretto:Latin from Officium Defunctorum
Duration:1’26”
Label(s):QP 187 CD 1
Text:
R. Circumdederunt me gemitus mortis; dolores inferni circumdederunt me.

Translation:
R. The sorrow of death surrounded me; the pain of hell encompassed me around.
Contributor:Wim Goossens
This Antiphon is used in the Officium Defunctorum ad Matutinum and set by Hernando Franco for four voices (SATB). The Circumdederunt is often especially used by Spanish and Portuguese composers in the Office of the Dead like Cristobal de Morales(c.1500-1553), Pedro Fernandez (1483-1574), Aires Fernandez (16th C.), Juan de Avila ( 16th C.), Hernando Franco (1532-1585), Juan Gutiérrez de Padilla (c.1590-1664), Bartolomeo Trosylho (1500-1567), the German Balthasar de Senarius (c.1485-1544) and even Orlando di Lasso (1532-1594), Jacob Regnart (1540-1599) and William Byrd (1543-1623) did. Settings by Jacobus Clemens and Philippus de Monte have until yet not been judged in this context. As we saw this Antiphon is set by them all as an invitatory Antiphon for the Office of the Dead. On the other hand the interesting plainchant Circumdederunt is often used in chansons, motets, parody masses and even used in the splendid Requiem Mass by the Jean Richafort (c.1480-c.1547) a composer belonging to the third Netherlandish generation.
This Antiphon is chosen by Franco as an invitatory antiphon (Motet) used at Matins of the Dead or at the Office of the Dead in the Spanish New World.
This motet “Circumdederunt“ is written in a discrete polyphonic style, but with the plainchant present in a clear way. Hernando Franco uses a very short version of the Antiphon of the Inventorium de Officium Defunctorum. The text used by Franco is that earlier used by Cristóbal de Morales (c.1500-1553) in his settings. The plainchant is in the Superior with the same texture de Morales did. Franco uses some fine word-painting in “gemitus”, “inferni”, and the second “circumdederunt”. This Circumdederunt (II) consists in total out of 19 bars.
This four-part Circumdederunt me, is found and rediscovered in 2002 in Libros de polifonía de la Catedral Metropolitana de Mexico nr. 11, books with polyphonic music in de cathedral of México (± 1600) and published in this version this Circumdederunt has number 35 and found in a later volume Mexico 2 (copied 17th century).
Author:Wim Goossens
Regem cui omnia
Period:High Renaissance
Musical form:Motet a 4 vocibus
Text/libretto:Latin from Officium Defunctorum
Duration:0’40”
Label(s):QP 187 CD 1
Text:
A. Regem cui omnia vivunt. Venite adoremus.

Translation:
A. The King, unto whom all things do live, come let us adore him.
Contributor:Wim Goossens
The invatory plainchant Antiphon “Regem cui omnia vivunt” is used in the Officium Defunctorum ad Matutinum and still used and published in the Office of the Dead at Matins, old Liber Usualis page 1779. This Antiphon in Matins was normally “Regem cui,” however under some circumstances in Spain and Mexico substituted by the early mentioned “Circumdederunt me” as we already saw. This Antiphon is chosen by Hernando Franco as an invitatory antiphon (Motet) used at Matins of the Dead or at the Office of the Dead in the Spanish New World.
This short motet “Regem cui” is written in a chordal homophonic style, but with the plainchant present in a clear way. Hernando Franco uses a very short version of the Antiphon of the Inventorium de Officium Defunctorum. This four-part Regem cui omnia, is found and rediscovered in 2002 in Libros de polifonía de la Catedral Metropolitana de Mexico nr. 11, books with polyphonic music in de cathedral of México (± 1600) and published in this version this Regem cui has number 36 and further found in a later volume Mexico 2 (copied 17th century).
Author:Wim Goossens
Dirige, Domine deus
Period:High Renaissance
Musical form:Motet a 4 vocibus
Text/libretto:Latin from Officium Defunctorum
Duration:0’35”
Label(s):QP 187 CD 1
Text:
A. Dirige, Domine Deus meus in conspectu tuo viam meam.

Translation:
A. Direct O Lord God my way in thy sight.
Contributor:Wim Goossens
The plainchant Antiphon “Dirige, Domine Deus” is used in the Officium Defunctorum ad Matutinum and still used and published in the Office of the Dead at Matins, old Liber Usualis page 1782.
This Antiphon is chosen by Franco as an invitatory Antiphon (Motet) which is normally used at Matins of the Dead or at the Office of the Dead in the Spanish New World.
This short motet “Dirige, Domine Deus” is written in a discrete polyphonic style, but with the plainchant present in a clear way. Hernando Franco uses a very short version of this Antiphon de Officium Defunctorum ad Matutinum, in primo nocturno. This four-part Antiphon was anonymously published in the below source but attributed to Franco. This four-part Dirige, Domine Deus, is found and rediscovered in 2002 in Libros de polifonía de la Catedral Metropolitana de Mexico nr. 11, books with polyphonic music in de cathedral of México (± 1600) and published in this version this Dirige, Domine Deus has number 37 and found in a later volume Mexico 2 (copied 17th century).
Author:Wim Goossens
Convertere Domine
Period:High Renaissance
Musical form:Motet a 4 vocibus
Text/libretto:Latin from Officium Defunctorum
Duration:0’43”
Label(s):QP 187 CD 1
Text:
A. Convertere Domine et eripe animam meam:
quoniam non est in morte qui memor sit tui

Translation:
A. Turn thee O Lord, and deliver my soul:
because that in death none is mindful of thee.
Contributor:Wim Goossens
The plainchant Antiphon “Convertere Domino ” is used in the Officium Defunctorum ad Matutinum and still used and published in the Office of the Dead at Matins, old Liber Usualis page 1783.
This second Antiphon in primo nocturno is chosen by Franco which is normally used at Matins of the Dead or at the Office of the Dead in the Spanish New World.
This short motet “Convertere Domine” is written in a chordal homophonic style, but with the plainchant present in a clear way. Hernando Franco uses a very short version of this Antiphon de Officium Defunctorum ad Matutinum, in primo nocturno. This four-part Antiphon was anonymously published in the below source but due to other sources attributed to Franco. This four-part Convertere Domine, is found in Libros de polifonía de la Catedral Metropolitana de Mexico, volume Mexico 2 (copied 17th century).
Author:Wim Goossens
Domine, ne in furore
Period:High Renaissance
Musical form:Motet a 4-6 vocibus
Text/libretto:Latin from Officium Defunctorum
Duration:5’37”
Label(s):QP 187 CD 1
Text:
[1] Domine ne in furore tuo arguas me:
neque in ira tua cortipias me.
[2] Miserere mei Domine, quoniam infirmus sum:
sana me Domine quoniam conturbata sunt.
[3] Et anima mea turbata est valde:
sed tu Domine usquequo.
[4] Convertere Domine et eripe animam meam:
salvum me fac propter misericordiam tuam.
[5] Quoniam non est in morte qui memor sit tui:
in inferno au tem quis confitebitur tibi.
[6] Laboravi in gemitu me o, lavabo per sinlas las noctes lectum meum:
lacrimis meis stratum meum rigabo.
[7] Turbatus est a furo re oculus meus:
inveteravi inter omes inimicos meos
[8] Discedite a me omnes qui operamini iniquitatem:
quoniam exaudivit Dominus vocem fletus mei.
[9] Exaudivit Dominus deprecationem meam:
Dominus orationem meam suscepit.
[10] Erubescam et conturbentur vehementer omnes inimici mei:
convertantur et erubescant valde velociter.
[11] Requiem aeternam: dona eis Domine Domine.
[12] Et lux perpetua: luceat eis.

Translation:
[1] Lord rebuke me not in thy fury:
nor chastise me in thy wrath.
[2] Have mercy on me Lord, because I am weak: heal me Lord,
because all my bones be troubled.
[3} And my soul is troubled exceedingly:
but thou Lord how long.
[4] Turn thee O Lord, and deliver my soul:
save me for thy mercy.
[5] Because there is not in death, that is mindful of thee:
and in hell who shall confess to thee?
[6] I have laboured in my mourning, I will every night wash my bed:
I will water my couch with my tears.
[7] Mine eye is troubled for fury:
I have waxen old among all mine enemies.
[8] Depart from me all ye, that work iniquity:
because our Lord hath heard the voice of my weeping.
[9] Our Lord hath heard my petition:
our Lord hath received my prayer.
[10] Let all my enemies be ashamed, and very sore troubled:
let them be converted and ashamed very speedily.
[11] Eternal rest give unto them O Lord:
[12] and let perpetual light shine unto them.
Contributor:Wim Goossens
The plainchant Psalm 6 “Domine, ne in furore” is used in the Officium Defunctorum ad Matutinum and still used and published in the Office of the Dead at Matins, old Liber Usualis page 1783.
This Psalm 6 in primo nocturno is chosen by Hernando Franco which is normally used at Matins of the Dead or at the Office of the Dead in the Spanish New World.
This long motet “Domine, ne in furore” is written in a chordal homophonic style, but with the plainchant present in a clear way. Hernando Franco uses this Psalm 6 de Officium Defunctorum ad Matutinum, in primo nocturno. This four to six-part Psalm was anonymously published in the below first mentioned sources but due to other sources attributed to Franco.
The odd verses are set in a severe polyphonic but homophonic way set for four parts (SATB). The straight verses have been sung in plainchant. The verse 11 is written in a short imposing six-part setting (SSATTB). The last sentence “et lux perpetua” is not ommitted by Franco and will be sung in a plainchant. The more-part settings consists out of 69 bars. This four to six -part “Domine, ne in furore” is found and rediscovered in 2002 in Libros de polifonía de la Catedral Metropolitana de Mexico nr. 11, books with polyphonic music in de cathedral of México (± 1600) and published in this version this Domine ne in furore has number 38 and found in a later volume Mexico 2 (copied 17th century, Biblioteca Turriana de la Catedral LC 2 folios 8-10), in Mexico City, Bilbioteca Turriana de la Catedral, LC 11 folios 85-87, in Puebla, Archivo de musica sacra de la Cathedral Ms.3, folios 77-79 and in Bloomington, Indiana University, Lilly Library , Ms. 4.
Author:Wim Goossens
Nequando rapiat
Period:High Renaissance
Musical form:Motet a 4 vocibus
Text/libretto:Latin from Officium Defunctorum
Duration:0’50”
Label(s):QP 187 CD 1
Text:
A. Nequando Rapiat
ut leo animam meam,
dum non est qui redimat,
neque qui salvum faciat.

Translation:
A. Lest peradventure
he may catch my soul as a Lion,
whilst there is none which may redeem it,
or which may save it.
Contributor:Wim Goossens
The plainchant Antiphon “Nequando rapiat” is used in the Officium Defunctorum ad Matutinum and still used and published in the Office of the Dead at Matins, old Liber Usualis page 1784.
This third Antiphon in primo nocturno is chosen by Franco which is normally used at Matins of the Dead or at the Office of the Dead in the Spanish New World.
This short motet “Nequando rapiat” is written in a chordal homophonic style, but with the plainchant present in a clear way. Hernando Franco uses a very short version of this Antiphon de Officium Defunctorum ad Matutinum, in primo nocturno. This four-part “Nequando rapiat”, is found in Libros de polifonía de la Catedral Metropolitana de Mexico, volume Mexico 2 (copied 17th century).
Author:Wim Goossens
Parce mihi Domine
Period:High Renaissance
Musical form:Motet a 4 vocibus
Text/libretto:Latin from Officium Defunctorum
Duration:4’35”
Label(s):QP 187 CD 1
Text:
Lectio I
Parce mihi Domine nihil enim sunt dies mei.
Quid est homo quia magnificas eum?
aut quid apponis erga eum cor tuum?
Visitas eum diluculo, et subito probas illum.
Usquequo non parcis mihi nec dimittis me,
ut glutiam salivam meam?
Peccavi, quid faciam tibi o custos hominum?
Quare posuisti me contrarium tibi,
et factus sum mihimetipsi gravis?
Cur non tollis peccatum meum,
et quare non aufers iniquitatem meam?
Ecce nunc in pulvere dormiam:
et si mane me quaesieris, non subsistam.
(Job 7, 16-21)

Translation:
Lectio I
Spare me O Lord for my days are nothing.
What is man, that thou magnifies him:
or why settest thou thy heart toward him?
Thou dost visit him early in the morning, and suddenly thou provest him.
How long dost thou not spare me, nor suffer me,
that I swallow my spittle?
I have sinned. What shall I do to thee, O keeper of men?
Why hast thou set me contrary to thee,
and I am become burdensome to myself?
Why dost thou not take away my sin,
and why dost thou not take away mine iniquity?
Behold now I shall sleep in the dust,
and if thou seek me in the morning, I shall not be.
(Job7, 16-21)
Contributor:Wim Goossens
This “Parce mihi Domine” is Lesson I, Lectio primo used in the Officium Defunctorum ad Matutinum and still used and published in the Office of the Dead at Matins, old Liber Usualis page 1785.
This Lesson I in primo nocturno is chosen by Franco which is normally used at Matins of the Dead or at the Office of the Dead in the Spanish New World.
This long motet “Parce mihi Domine” is written in a chordal homophonic style, but in a recitation way in the “Tiple/Superior” and other voices. Hernando Franco uses this Lesson I de Officium Defunctorum ad Matutinum, in primo nocturno. This four-part (SATB) Psalm was anonymously published in the below source but due to other sources attributed to Franco. But there is still some doubt about the authorship of Franco of this first Lesson. Only in the Puebla, Cathedral, partbooks without numbers there is a reference to Franco: “Franco?”. The total motet consists out of 86 bars.
This four part “Domine, ne in furore” is found and was anonymously published in the below source and rediscovered but attributed to Franco in 2002 in Libros de polifonía de la Catedral Metropolitana de Mexico nr. 11, books with polyphonic music in de cathedral of México (± 1600) and published in this version this Parce mihi Domine has number 39 and found in a later volume Mexico 2 (copied 17th centur, Biblioteca Turriana de la Catedral LC 2 folios 10-12), in Mexico City, Bilbioteca Turriana de la Catedral, LC 11, folios 87-90 and in Puebla, Archivo de musica sacra de la Cathedral Ms.3 folios 79-82 and in Puebla, Cathedral, partbooks with reference to Franco (Franco?).
Author:Wim Goossens
Qui Lazarum resuscitasti
Period:High Renaissance
Musical form:Motet à 4 vocibus
Text/libretto:Latin from a Responsorium de Officium Defunctorum
Duration:4’29”
Label(s):QP 187 CD 1
Text:
R. Qui Lazarum resucitasti a monumento foetidum:
Tu eis Domine, dona requiem et locum indulgentiae.
V. Qui venturus est judicare vivos et mortuos, et saeculum per ignem.
R. Tu eis Domine, dona requiem et locum indulgentiae
V. Kyrie eleison. Requiescat in pace.

Translation:
R. Thou which didst raise Lazarus stinking from the grave:
Thou O Lord give them rest, and place of pardon.
V. Which art to come to judge the living, and the dead, and the world by fire.
R. Thou O Lord give them rest, and place of pardon.
Lord have mercy upon me.
V. Eternal rest give unto them.
Contributor:Wim Goossens
Qui Lazarum resuscitasti is a second plainchant Responsorium from de Officium Defunctorum Ad Matutinum in primo nocturno. This motet is set by Hernando Franco for four voices (SATB). The Qui Lazarum resuscitasti is an old Responsorium, Respond and still published in the old Liber Usualis page 1786 and is sung after Lectio II in the Office of the Dead. Hernando Franco ends this motet with Kyrië eleison and a Requiescat in pace. The Motet consists out of five homophonic phrases alternated with four plainchant phrases. The total motet consists out of 76 bars. This four-part Respond “Qui Lazarum resuscitasti” is found and was anonymously published in the below mentioned source and rediscovered and attributed to Franco in 2002 in Libros de polifonía de la Catedral Metropolitana de Mexico nr. 11, books with polyphonic music in de cathedral of México (± 1600) and published in this Book this Qui Lazarum resuscitasti has number 40. Further found in a later volume Mexico 2 (copied 17th century, Biblioteca Turriana de la Catedral LC 2 folios 12-13), in the Newberry Choirbooks in the Library of Chicago (USA) and in the Puebla Libro de Coro III, in Mexico City, Bilbioteca Turriana de la Catedral, LC 11 folios 89-90 and in Puebla, Archivo de musica sacra de la Cathedral Ms.3, folios 90-91, and in Chicago, Newberry Library Ms1, folios 82-83.
Author:Wim Goossens
Ne recorderis
Period:High Renaissance
Musical form:Motet à 4 vocibus
Text/libretto:Latin from a Responsorium de Officium Defunctorum
Duration:4’53”
Label(s):QP 187 CD 2
Text:
R. Ne recorderis peccata mea, Domine,
Dum veneris judicare saeculum per ignem.
V. Dirige, Domine Deus meus,
In conspectu tuo viam meam.
Kyrie eleison,Christe eleison, Kyrie eleison.

Translation:
R. Remember not O Lord my sins,
whilst thou shalt come to judge the world by fire.
V. Direct O Lord my God
my way in thy sight.
Lord have mercy upon me. Christ have mercy upon me,
Lord Have mercy upon me.
Contributor:Wim Goossens
The “Ne recorderis” is the last plainchant Responsorium from de Officium Defunctorum Ad Matutinum in secundo nocturno. This motet is set by Hernando Franco for four voices (SATB). The “Ne recorderis” is an old Responsorium, Respond and still published in the old Liber Usualis page 1792 and is sung after Lectio VI in the Office of the Dead at Matins. But not in the Choir-book Manuale sacramentorum secundum usum ecclesiae Mexicanae ( Mexico City, 1560). In that choir-book the Respond “Ne Recorderis” is present in primo nocturno. This version of the Office of the Dead includes two Responsories “Qui Lazarum resuscitasti” and “Ne recorderis.” This is to confirm the two mentioned Responds are used in primo Nocturno in celebrations Office of the dead in Mexico City Cathedral around 1560. Here Franco practices polyphony in alternation with the plainchant in reflecting the position of the polyphonic singers and the rest of the clergy who could sing the plainchant phrases. The polyphonic textures is austerely chordal. This Repond as we saw in the “Qui Lazarum resuscitasti” finishes too with Kyrië eleison. Franco omitted the wording “Requiem aeternam dona eis Domine: et lux perpetua leuceat eis.” Perhaps this last sentence is not in use in the Cathedral!? This four-part Respond “Ne recorderis” is found and was anonymously published in the below mentioned source and rediscovered but attributed to Franco in 2002 in Libros de polifonía de la Catedral Metropolitana de Mexico nr. 11, books with polyphonic music in de cathedral of México (± 1600) and published in this Book this Ne recorderis has number 41 and found in a later volume Mexico 2 (copied 17th century). In Choir-book Mexico nr. 11 there is another number (44) with the same and last title in the last mentioned Book. For us at this stage doubfull which one can be attributed to Franco.
Author:Wim Goossens
Memento mei deus
Period:High Renaissance
Musical form:Motet à 4 vocibus
Text/libretto:Latin from a Responsorium de Officium Defunctorum
Duration:3’12”
Label(s):EMI CDS 7 54341-2
QP 187 CD 2
Text:
R. Memento mei Deus, quia ventus est vita mea:
Nec aspiciat me visus hominis.
V. De profundis clamavi ad te Domine:
Domine exaudi vocem meam.
R. Nec aspiciat me visus hominis.
Kyrië eleison, Kyrië eleison.

Translation:
R. O God be mindful of me, for that my life is but wind,
nor the sight of man may behold me.
V. From the depths I did cry to thee O Lord,
O Lord hear my voice.
R. nor the sight of man may behold me.
Lord have mercy upon me,
Lord have mercy upon me.
Contributor:Wim Goossens
The Memento mei deus is a first plainchant Responsorium from de Officium Defunctorum Ad Matutinum in secundo nocturne. This motet is set by Hernando Franco for four voices (SATB). The Memento mei deus is an old Responsorium, Respond and still published in the old Liber Usualis page 1791 and is sung after Lectio IV in the Office of the Dead at Matins. Here Franco practices polyphony in alternation with the plainchant in reflecting the position of the polyphonic singers and the rest of the clergy who could sing the plainchant phrases. The polyphonic textures is austerely chordal. Also this Repond finishes with Kyrië eleison. The total motet consists out of 90 bars.
This four-part Respond “Memento mei deus” is found and was anonymously published in the below mentioned source, rediscovered and attributed to Franco in 2002 in Libros de polifonía de la Catedral Metropolitana de Mexico nr. 11, books with polyphonic music in de cathedral of México folios 91-92 (± 1600) and published in this Choir-book this Memento mei deus has number 42. Published in a later volume Mexico 2 (copied 17th century in Mexico City, Bilbioteca Turriana de la Catedral, LC 11 folios 91-92) and this motet is also found in the Convento de la Encarnación Carmen/Carmen Codex.
Author:Wim Goossens
Peccantem me quotidie
Period:High Renaissance
Musical form:Motet a 4 vocibus
Text/libretto:Latin Responsorium ad Matutinum de Officium Defunctorum
Duration:3’11”
Label(s):QP 187 CD 2
Text:
R. Peccantem me quotidie et non me penitentem, timor mortis conturbat me:
quia in inferno nulla est redemptio. Miserere mei, Deus.
V.Deus in nomine tuo, salvum me fac.
R. Quia in inferno nulla est redemptio. Miserere mei, Deus.
Kyrië eleison, Kyrië eleison

Translation:
R. The fear of death overwhelms me, who sin every day and not repent:
for in hell there is no redemption. Have mercy on me O God and spare me.
V. Save me, O God, by thy name, and in thy mercy deliver me.
R. For in hell there is no redemption. Have mercy on me O God.
V. Lord have mercy upon me,
V. Lord have mercy upon me.
Contributor:Wim Goossens
Peccantem me quotidie is a plainchant from the Responsorium de Officium Defunctorum Ad Matutinum. This Responsory from the Office of the Dead set by Hernando Franco in a motet for four voices (SATB). The Peccantem me quotidie is an old Responsorium a Respond which is still published in the old Liber Usualis page 1797 and is sung after Lectio VII in the third Nocturn. The Peccantem me quotidie is written by Hernando Franco in a modest more homophonic polyphonic setting using some flats (see “Inferno”) and sharps, fine dissonant to express his feelings and to underline the wording of this Respond. Franco set this Respond in function of the use in the liturgy in using the belonging plainchant in alternation. Franco uses compared to the Liber Usualis some minor other texts and ends with Kyrië eleison, due to the Tridentine Office in Castile. The total Respond contains including the plainchant out of 79 bars.
This setting ends in d-minor. This four-part Respond “Peccantem me quotidie” is found and was anonymously published in the below mentioned source, rediscovered and attributed to Franco in 2002 in Libros de polifonía de la Catedral Metropolitana de Mexico nr. 11, books with polyphonic music in de cathedral of México (± 1600) and published in this Choir-book this Peccantem has number 45. Published in a later volume Mexico 2 (copied 17th century, Biblioteca Turriana de la Catedral LC 2 folios 35-36) and this motet is also found in the Convento de la Encarnación Carmen/Carmen Codex (with “fer. Fran”) and in Mexico City, Bilbioteca Turriana de la Catedral, LC 11, folios 92-93.
Author:Wim Goossens