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Marcin Mielczewski
c.1600 - 1651
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M. Mielczewski
Marcin Mielczewski (c.1600 - 09/1651), a Polish composer, from Warsaw. He was, together with his tutor Franciszek Lilius and Bartłomiej Pękiel, among the most notable Polish composers in the 17th century. By 1632 he was a composer and musician in the royal chapel in Warsaw. In 1645 he became director of music to Charles Ferdinand Vasa, the brother of King Władysław IV. Mielczewski died in Warsaw in September 1651. His known works are largely in the concertato style, and Szweykowski suggests that the way "in which the words are given full expression" means he is likely to have composed secular vocal works in addition to the surviving sacred corpus. In his mass O glorioso domina and one of his instrumental canzonas, Mielczewski quotes popular Polish tunes; the latter is notable for being the earliest documented use of the mazurka in classical music.
Missa "Pro defuncto fundatore"
Period:Late Renaissance
Musical form:mass
Text/libretto:Latin mass
Missa "Pro defuncto fundatore".
Source:Robert Chase, Dies Irae: A Guide to Requiem Music, Scarecrow Press, Inc. 2003
All his compositions, amounting to just over forty, may be classified as belonging to two different styles: an older, traditional church style based on a cantus firmus and the more modern one freed from any dependence on plainsong and thus seeking new means of expression.
Source:Grove's dictionary of music and musicians
Later in the 17th century numerous requiem settings, many in concertato style, were produced by composers including G.B. Bassani, G.A. Bernabei, Antonio Bertali (eight settings), Biber, Giovanni Cavaccio, Cavalli, Cazzati, Joan Cererols, G.P. Colonna, P.A. Fiocco (three settings), Santino Girelli, J.K. Heller, J.C. Kerll (two settings), A.V. Michna, Marcin Mielczewski, Alessandro Scarlatti, Johann Stadlmayer, Christoph Straus (two settings) and Viadana.
Author:Steven Chang-Lin Yu