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Giuseppe Ottavio Pitoni
1657 - 1743
Italy
Picture
G.O. Pitoni
Giuseppe Ottavio Pitoni -also: Joseph Pitoni- (18/03/1657 - 01/02/1743), an Italian musician and composer, born in Rieti. He was buried in the church of San Marco, where he had been choirmaster, in the Pitoni family vault. His biography, by his pupil Girolamo Chiti, is in the library of the Corsini palace. At five years he began to study music at Rome. Not yet sixteen, he composed pieces which were sung in the church of the Holy Apostles. At that age he was in charge of the choir at Monte Rotondo; at seventeen at the Cathedral of Assisi. At twenty (1677) he returned to Rome, and was maestro di cappella in many churches; in 1708 he was appointed director of St. John Lateran. In 1719 he became choirmaster of St. Peter's, and remained in that office for twenty-four years. In the Accademia di S. Cecilia he was one of the four esaminatori dei maestri. Pitoni acquired such a marvellous facility, that for his compositions, which were of great musical value, he could write every part separately, without making a score. The number of his compositions, says Chiti, is infinite. Many of them are written for three and four choirs. He also began a Mass for twelve choirs; but his advanced age did not allow him to finish it. He left a work Notizie dei maestri di Cappella si di Roma che oltramontani.
Oeuvre of Pitoni: 278 masses: 133 for 4 voices, 1 for 5 voices "sinfonie", 104 for 8 voices, 2 for 9 voices (pro defunctis), 1 for 12 voices, 8 for 16 voices. 46 masses incomplete for 4 and 8 voices; 14 introiti with kyrie; 207 introiti for a mass; 231 graduals; 15 sequences; 211 offertori; 16 communio; 637 antifone; 255 hymns; 789 psalms; 231 canticles; 37 litanies; 24 lamentations; 24 responsori; 236 motets, total 3500 religious works and some secular works. Moreover: three oratoria (one in Latin). Pitoni was also a theoretician and a historian.
Requiem with Libera me
Period:Baroque
Musical form:mass
Text/libretto:Latin mass
Requiem with Libera me for mixed chorus (SATB) unaccompanied.
Dies irae
Period:Baroque
Musical form:motet
Text/libretto:Thomas de Celano
Missa pro defunctis
Period:Baroque
Composed in:1688
Musical form:mass
Text/libretto:Latin mass
The Missa pro defunctis (Mass for the Dead), generally known as the Requiem Mass, differs from the normal five-part musical Ordinary of the Catholic Mass. Its form remained fluid until the seventeenth century, and settings of the famous "Sequence", "Dies irae" (Day of wrath) did not appear regularly until the Baroque period. Early requiems alternated plainsong sections (intoned by a priest) with contrapuntal or choral sections (sung by the choir) until Giuseppe Pitoni (1657-1743), abandoned that practice in his Requiem of 1688.
Author:Dr. Laura Prichard
The polyphonic treatment illustrated by Asola and Pitoni's Requiems is traced in Liszt's Totentanz.
Author:Joseph Yasser
Source:"Dies Irae: The Famous Medieval Chant." In: Musical Courier (6 October 1927)
Missa pro defunctis
Period:Baroque
Composed in:1735
Musical form:mass
Text/libretto:Latin mass
Missa pro defunctis for 8 voices, written in 1734/1735.
Source:Dagny Wegner, Requiemvertonungen in Frankreich zwischen 1670 und 1850, Hamburg, 2005