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Johann Baptiste Maximilian Reger
1873 - 1916
Germany
Picture
M. Reger
Max Reger (19/03/1873 - 11/05/1916), a German composer, born in Brand (Bavaria). He studied at the Realschiule, but his earliest training in harmonium and piano was from his father. He received organ lessons from Lindner.
In 1889 Reger received an acceptance letter from the great organ teacher Hugo Reimann at the Sonderhausen Conservatory, and in April of 1890 Reger left home to study with him, even changing schools when Reimann left Sonderhausen for the Weisbaden Conservatore in April 1891.
Reger settled again in Weiden in 1896, and began composing. Five years passed before he started gaining recognition for his work. From 1905 to 1906 he worked additionally as a professor of counterpoint at Königliche Akademie der Tonkunst. In 1907 he was appointed music director at the University of Leipzig and conductor of the University Chorus St. Pauli. From 1911-1915 he was the Hofkappellmeister in Meiningen.
Reger was the first German composer since J.S. Bach to devote so much of his compositional output to the organ. He believed strongly in absolute music, an ideal shared by Bach. Reger's pieces are incredibly pianistic and virtuosic, while still exploring the symphonic colors of the organ.
Requiem - Seele, vergiss Sie nicht
Period:Expressionism
Musical form:free
Text/libretto:Friedrich Hebbel
Label(s):Vanguard Classics 99049
Requiem - Seele, vergiss Sie nicht, opus 83, for men's choir (TTBB). Poem by Friedrich Hebbel (1813 - 1863).
Source:booklet of cd Vanguard Classics 99049
Requiem - Seele, vergiss Sie nicht
Period:Expressionism
Composed in:1915
Musical form:free
Text/libretto:Friedrich Hebbel
Duration:15'24''
Label(s):Koch CD 313 004 H1
Requiem opus 144b, for baritone, mixed choir and orchestra. Reger's attempt to create a monumental choral-orchestral masterpiece failed but resulted in several chips from the compositon bench including the op. 144b Requiem, based on a poem by Friedrich Hebbel (1813 - 1863) dedicated to the German soldiers fallen in the first years of World War I as well as the op. 144a, based on a poem by Eichendorff ("The Hermit") in which the solitary one toils on his works of art uncaring of the bellicose turmoil in the war around him.
Source:www.recordsinternational.com
A requiem motet: "Seele, vergiss Sie nicht, Seele, vergiss nicht die Toten". The text is a poem by the German poet Friedrich Hebbel (1813 - 1863).

Requiem

Seele, vergiss Sie nicht,
Seele, vergiss nicht die Toten!
Sieh', Sie umschweben dich,
schauernd verlassen,
und in den heiligen Gluten,
die den Armen die Liebe schürt,
atmen Sie auf und erwarmen,
und geniessen zum letzten Mal
ihr verglimmendes Leben.

Seele, vergiss Sie nicht,
Seele, vergiss nicht die Toten!

Und wenn du dich ihnen verschliessest,
so erstarren Sie bis hinein in das Tiefste.
Dann ergreift Sie der Sturm der Nacht
dem Sie zusammengekrampft
in sich trotzten im Schoss der Liebe.
Und er jagt Sie mit Ungestüm
durch die endlose Wüste hin,
wo nicht Leben mehr ist,
nur Kampf losgelassener Kräfte
neuerneuertes Sein.

Seele, vergiss Sie nicht,
Seele, vergiss nicht die Toten.
Picture
C.F. Hebbel (text)
Lateinische Requiem
Period:Expressionism
Composed in:1916
Duration:22'04''
Label(s):Koch CD 313 004 H1
Lateinische Requiem opus 145a, written in 1916 for choir and organ.
Dies irae
Period:Expressionism
Composed in:1916
Musical form:fragment
Label(s):Koch CD 313 004 H1
This is an unfinished requiem fragment.