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Philippe Rogier
1561 - 1596
Belgium / The Neherlands
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Ph. Rogier
Philippe Rogier (1561 - 29/02/1596), a Flemish composer who was born in the Low Countries more specific Atrecht (Arras), but spent his whole life in the service of Philip II of Spain (reg. 1555-1598). Coming from Flanders Philippe Rogier was the last and perhaps the greatest of the Flemish composers who served the Spanish court. He was recruited in 1572 as a boy soprano by the new choirmaster the Fleming Gérard van Turnhout (c.1520-1580). As was customary, Philip II would have provided Rogier with higher education, usually intended as preparation for a career as priest. The normal practice was to send these boys, once their voices broke, back to the Low Countries to universities such as Douai, Tournai or Louvain. From 1585-1586 Rogier was vice maestro di Capilla under George de La Hèle (1547-1587), who was maestro since 1581.
Rogier must have been ordained priest, because in the dedication of his motets published in 1595 the initial “S.”, the customary abbreviation for sacerdos, appears after his name. Furthermore, the list that records the members of the Royal Chapel after 1586 includes Rogier’s name amongst the chaplains.
In 1588 Rogier succeeded de La Hèle as maestro di Capilla and stayed in this position until his dead in Madrid on 29th February 1596.
In 1585 Rogier travelled with the Royal chapel to Zaragoza for the nuptial festivities of Charles Emmanuel I and the Infanta of Castille.
In May 1581 he was granted a non-residential benefice at the church of Notre Dame at Yvoir (near Namur), and later he was named a chaplain of the church of Notre Dame at Atrecht/Arras, his birthplace.
In 1590 Rogier travelled to the Low Countries to engage new boy singers for the Royal Capilla.
In 1593 Philip II awarded Rogier an annual pension.
His last work, mentioned as such in the catalogue of music in the library of John IV of Portugal, was Taedet anima mea (a 6 voices), written for a mass of the dead. In his will, Rogier instructed his student the Fleming Géry de Ghersem (c.1574-1630) to undertake the publication of five of his masses, a task which was duly carried out two years later.
In the library of King John IV of Portugal, destroyed in the Lisbon earthquake and following fire of 1755, Rogier was represented by at least 243 compositions, including 8 masses, 2 magnificats, 2 antiphons, 2 responsories, 27 verses, 66 motets, 65 chansons, and 71 villancicos. Other works by Rogier were no doubt housed in the library of the Spanish royal chapel in Madrid, which was destroyed by fire in 1734. Rogier wrote as fare we know 33 Masses.
Unfortunately a real assessment of Rogier’s music may never be possible; his today 51 known preserved works – eight masses (for four, eight and twelve voices) , 36 motets (for four, five, six, eight and twelve voices), three miscellaneous sacred works, and four chansons – amount to little no more than a fifth of what Rogier is sure thought to have composed. The same applies for the above mentioned Géry de Ghersem, who composed 300 compositions, of which survived after the mentioned catastrophes only 2!
We know that by reading the catalogues from the library of King John IV of Portugal. The destroying of King John’s rich Music-library was an enormous disaster.
The only publication of Rogiers works during the sixteenth century was a collection of motets published in 1595. This book was printed in Naples and was dedicated to Albert Acquaviva, Duke of Atri, in the Kingdom of Naples. During the 15th and 16th centuries, musicians of the Flemish school dominated all over Europe: England excluded. These eminent composers, musicians and singers held all the most prestigious appointments in cathedrals and court chapels. Composers working in Italy, France, Spain, Low Countries, Bohemian, Habsburg, Austria, or Germany – such as Guillaume Dufay, Josquin des Près, Philippe de Monte, Philippe Rogier, Jacob Vaet, Jacob Regnart, Mateo Romero and Orlandus Lassus – have achieved lasting fame and have warranted the greatest attention in contemporary Renaissance studies.
Phillip II of Spain inherited successive Flemish as Maestros de Capilla: Nicolas Payen (c.1512—1559), Pierre de Manchicourt (c.1510-1564), Jean de Bonmarché (c.1520-1570), Gérard van Turnhout ( c.1520-1580), George de la Hèle (1547-1586) , Philippe Rogier (1561-1596) and Mateo Romero/Mathieu Rosemarin (1575-1647). Romero resigned in 1633 and with his resignation came in Spain an end of the supremacy of the excellent Flemish musicians who worked all over Europe!
Author:Wim Goossens
Heu mihi, Domine
Period:High Renaissance
Musical form:Motet à 5 vocibus
Text/libretto:Latin Responsorium ad Matutinum de Officium Defunctorum
Duration:4'01''
Label(s):Eufoda 1161
Linn Records CKD 109
A motet from the Responsorium de Officium Defunctorum Ad Matutinum. Responsory from Matins of the Dead written by Rogier for five voices (SATTB). The Responsorium Heu/ Hei mihi, Domine is still published in the old Liber Usualis page 1791. This setting by Rogier is found in a manuscript at the cathedral in Valladolid. The Heu mihi, Domine is written by Rogier in a fluent modest polyphonic counterpoint, using a lot of flats, with a modest tempo. He gave accents to the text in writing “quid faciam” in homophonic way (bars 30-34). Further Rogier uses illustrative descending pattern set for all voices at “Quia peccavi nimis” (bars 15-20). Further see or hear the interesting “ubi fugiam” (bars 34-40) in which the five voices are using different lines to contrast with each other, like a prelude into the baroque, but I think on the other hand musically to underline the text: where shall I flee, “Ubi fugiam”?
Author:Wim Goossens
The text of this motet:
Heu mihi Domine quia peccavi nimis, in vita mea:
quid faciam miser?
ubi fugiam nisi ad te Deus meus?
Miserere mei dum veneris in novissimo die.
Anima mea turbata est valde sed tu Domine succurre ei:
miserere mei dum veneris in novissimo die.

Translation:
Woe is me, Lord, for I have sinned greatly.
What shall become of me, wretch that I am;
where shall I flee, except to Thee, O Lord.
Have mercy on me when Thou shalt come on the last day.
My soul is greatly troubled but Thou, O Lord, sustainest me:
have mercy on me when Thou shalt come on the last day.
Contributor:Wim Goossens
Credo quod Redemptor
Period:High Renaissance
Musical form:motet à 5 vocibus
Text/libretto:Latin out of Resposorium de Officium Defunctorum
Duration:3'25''
Label(s):RIC 06152
A motet from the Responsorium de Officium Defunctorum ad Matutinum. A Responsory from Matins of the Office of the Dead composed by Philippe Rogier for five voices (SSATB). The Credo quod Redemptor is an old Responsorium and still published in the old Liber Usualis page 1785 and sung after Lesson I - Lectio primo - out of The Office of the Dead in the first Nocturn.
This setting by Rogier was found in the “cinco leciones” in a manuscript at the cathedral of Valladolid. Rogier uses very long notes in imitating the voices each other in polyphonic style, with homophonic movements in bars 66-79 to underline the text “in my flesh, I shall see God”. This is an early work by Rogier, it contains 94 bars.
Author:Wim Goossens
Text of this Respond:
Credo quod redemptor meus vivit et in novissimo die de terra surrecturus sum et in carne mea videbo deum Salvatorem meum.
Translation:

I know that my redeemer liveth, and that I shall stand at the latter day upon the earth: and in my flesh shall I see God, my saviour.
Contributor:Wim Goossens
Caligaverunt oculi mei
Period:High Renaissance
Composed in:1595c
Musical form:Motet à 6 vocibus
Text/libretto:Latin from a Responsorium de Officium Defunctorum
This is a motet from the Responsorium de Officium Defunctorum ad Matutinum composed for six voices (SSATTB) by Philippe Rogier. The Caligaverunt oculi mei is an old Responsorium. There are about 138 Responsoria de Officium Defunctorum, Responds from Office of the Dead known and used during centuries in the Office of the Dead. They are all well ordered, this is number 9. This setting by Rogier was published in Cantus quas vulgo Motecta apellant liber I, Napels 1595. Rogier uses an old version of the Respond in this splendid contemplative work. The plaintive turns and the emotional declamation of the text make this composition particularly expressive.
Author:Wim Goossens
The text of this motet:
Caligaverunt oculi mei a fletu meo quia elongatus est a me qui consolabatur me: videte omnes populi si est dolor similis sicut dolor meus.

Translation:
My eyes have grown dim with weeping; for he that consoled me is far from me. Behold, all ye people, if there is any sorrow like unto my sorrow.
Contributor:Wim Goossens
Dominus regit me
Period:High Renaissance
Composed in:1595c
Musical form:Motet à 5 vocibus
Text/libretto:Latin Officium Defunctorum ad Matutinum
Duration:5'38''
Label(s):Linn Records CKD 109
A motet out of the Officium Defunctorum Ad Matutinum. This text of psalm 22 is used in the Office of the Dead at Matins, second nocturn and written by Philippe Rogier for five voices (SA(A)TTB). The text of this motet is still published in the old Liber Usualis page 1788. Rogier uses only the first three Versicles of the text. This setting by Rogier was published in Cantus quas vulgo Motecta apellant liber I, Napels 1595. In this setting, in two parts, Rogier shows from the beginning in particular in this composition his mastery of long sustained polyphonic passages. Rogier uses well placed sharps, flats and some fine dissonant with fine harmonies. This excellent motet contains 102 bars.
Author:Wim Goossens
The text of this motet:
Dominus regit me, et nihil mihi deerit, In loco pascue, ibi me colocavit. Super aquam refectionis educavit me, Animam meam convertit, Deduxit me super semitas justitiae propter nomen suum.

Translation:
The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want. In verdant pastures he gives me repose. Beside restful waters he leads me. He refreshes my soul, he guides me in right paths, For his own name.
Contributor:Wim Goossens
Laboravi in gemitu meo
Period:High Renaissance
Composed in:1595c
Musical form:Motet à 6 vocibus
Text/libretto:Latin from Officium Defunctorum ad Matutinum
Duration:5'28''
Label(s):Linn Records CKD 109
This is a motet from the Officium Defunctorum ad Matutinum composed for six voices (SSATTB) by Philippe Rogier. Rogier uses part – only the sixth versicle - of the text of psalm 6 which is still published in the Liber Usualis page 1783 Office of the Dead at Matins, the first nocturn. Rogier in excellent mood express the sorrow in the text with “word painting”. See for instance in the “lavabo” Rogier uses in each voice all the score long designing running quarters, which will be repeated at the end sometimes in pairs in “rigabo”. This motet contains 94 bars. This setting by Rogier was published in Cantus quas vulgo Motecta apellant liber I, Napels 1595. The plaintive turns and the emotional declamation of the text make this composition particularly expressive. Rogier uses well placed sharps, flats and some fine dissonant with wandering harmonies.
Author:Wim Goossens
The text:
Laboravi in gemitu meo,
Lavabo per singulas noctes lectum meum.
Lachrismis meis stratum meum rigabo.


Translation:
I am wearied with sighing;
Every night I flood my bed with weeping;
I drench my couch with my tears.
Contributor:Wim Goossens
Peccavi quid faciam tibi
Period:High Renaissance
Composed in:1595c
Musical form:Motet à 6 vocibus
Text/libretto:Latin from Officium Defunctorum ad Matutinum
Duration:6'35''
Label(s):Linn Records CKD 109
This is a motet from the Officium Defunctorum ad Matutinum composed for six voices (SSATTB) by Philippe Rogier. Rogier uses part of the text of the first Lesson – lectio I – out of the Office of the Dead, the first nocturn which is published in the Liber Usualis at page 1785. Rogier starts in the three upper voices with a descending quint in the wording “Peccacvi”. This excellent motet written in two parts contains 131 bars. This setting by Rogier was published in Cantus quas vulgo Motecta apellant liber I, Napels 1595. The plaintive turns and the emotional declamation of the text make this composition particularly expressive. Rogier uses well placed sharps, flats and some fine dissonance with splendid wandering harmonies. Rogier maintains very long sections in a constantly shifting beautiful chosen sound-picture. The music found in this publication out of 1595 is a testimony of the really splendid skill of five Flemish/Netherlands generation composers of the skilful polyphony which they have written.
Author:Wim Goossens
Text:
1e. Peccavi, quid faciam tibi, O custos hominum?
Quare me posuisti contrarium tibi,
Et factus sum mihi met ipsi gravis?
Cur non tollis, peccatum meum,
Et quare non aufers iniquitatem meam?

2e. Ecce nunc in pulvere dormiam,
Et si mane me quaesieris, non subsistam.


Translation:
1e. Though I have sinned, what can I do to you,
O watcher of men?
Why have you set me up as an object of attack,
or why should I be a burden to you?
Why do you not pardon my offence
Or take away my guilt?

2e. For soon I shall lie down in the dust;
And should you seek me I shall then be gone.
Contributor:Wim Goossens
Tedet animam meam
Period:High Renaissance
Composed in:1596c
Musical form:Motet à 6 vocibus
Text/libretto:Latin from the Lectio II Officium Defunctorum
Duration:4'14''
Label(s):Linn Records CKD 109
The sentiment of penitence is expressed in this motet on texts from the Lectio secunda de Officium Defunctorum ad Matutinum, second Lesson at Matins of Office of the Dead. See the Liber Usualis page 1786. Tedet anima meam is published in a manuscript found in the cathedral of Valladolid. The official Latin wording is “Taedet” but in the manuscript written “Tedet”. This motet is written for six low voices (AATTBB), giving to this motet a dark colouring. Rogier uses only the first three sentences of the second Lesson in this splendid contemplative work. This motet is closely scored and contains 82 bars. Rogier starts with paired voices of imitation. Further Rogier uses well placed sharps, flats and some fine dissonance with splendid wandering harmonies. In the part “eloquium meum” Rogier uses excellent word-painting. The catalogue of the famous library of John VI of Portugal shows that this motet was perhaps the last work Rogier composed. If true Rogier has chosen an excellent text to do so! In general unfortunately only thirty-three motets of the known sixty-six – catalogue John VI - survived. This setting by Rogier was found in the “cinco leciones” in a manuscript at the cathedral of Valladolid. The music found in the publication in Valladolid is too a testimony of the really splendid skill of five Flemish/Netherlands generation composers of skilful polyphony which they have written.
Author:Wim Goossens
Text:
Taedet animam meam vitae meam dimittam adversum me eloquium meum. Loquar in amaritudine animae meae. Dicam Deo, noli me condemnare.

Translation:
My soul is wear of my life; I shall leave my words to speak against me, and speak in the bitterness in my soul. I will say to God: Do not condemn me.
Contributor:Wim Goossens
Vias tuas
Period:Late Renaissance
Musical form:Motet a 6 vocibus
Text/libretto:Latin out of Officium Defunctorum
Duration:3'50''
Label(s):Linn Records CKD 109
Vias tuas is a motet from the Officium Defunctorum Ad Matutinum composed by Rogier for six voices (SSATTB). This Vias tuas is part of a psalm text (24) and is used in the Office Defunctorum in secundo nocturno, second Nocturn. This version is published in the old Liber Usualis page 1788- 1789. Rogier uses the verses 4 and 5. Even this part is published in the Burnet Psalter page folio 281. This magnificent motet starts with a paired point of imitation in Sextus (II) and Tenor (V), which will be follwed by other pair voices (VI-V;I-II;IV-VI). Two contrasting musical phrases are set together, in imitative polyphonic style. Rogier uses flats and chromatic harmonies. In the text “Quia tu es Deus” (bars 65-72), Rogier uses some low homophony to underline the text, the same he did in a part of the Secunda pars “Memento mei tu”. Rogier (1560-1596) combined the skilful imitative style of all that Flemish Masters with the passionate utterances of his Spanish contemporaries, like Guerrero (1528-1599) and De Victoria (1548-1611). But see on the other hand the magnificent music by the Flemish Lassus ( 1532-1594) de Monte ( 1521-1603) and de Kerle ( 1531-1592). This motet is published in a collection of motets in Napels in 1595:Cantus, Philippi Rogerii, Invicitissmi Philippi Hispaniarum Regis, etc. Chori Musici Praefecti Sacrarum Modulationemum, Quas Vulgo , LIber Primus Neapoli. MDXCV.
Author:Wim Goossens
Text:
Vias tuas Domine demonstra mihi et; semitas tuas doce me,
Dirige me in veritate tua et doce me, quia tu es Deus salvator meus, et te sustinui tota die.

Translation:
Show, O Lord, thy ways to me, and teach me thy paths.
Direct me in thy truth, and teach me; for thou art God my Saviour; and on thee have I waited all the day long.
Contributor:Wim Goossens
Delicta iuventutis meae
Period:Late Renaissance
Musical form:Motet a 6 vocibus
Text/libretto:Latin out of Officium Defunctorum
Duration:3'57''
Label(s):Linn Records CKD 109
Delicta iuventutis meae is a motet from the Officium Defunctorum Ad Matutinum composed by Rogier for six voices (SSATTB). This Delicta iuventutis meae is part of a psalm text (24) verses 7 and 8 and is used in the Office Defunctorum in secundo nocturno, second Nocturn. This version is published in the old Liber Usualis page 1789. Even this part is published in the Burnet Psalter page folio 281. Rogier uses imitative polyphonic style. Rogier uses flats and chromatic harmonies. In the text “Memento Mei ” Rogier uses some low homophony to underline the text. Rogier (1560-1596) combined the skilful imitative style of all that Flemish Masters with the passionate utterances of his Spanish contemporaries, like Guerrero (1528-1599) and De Victoria (1548-1611). But see on the other hand the magnificent music by the Flemish Lassus ( 1532-1594) de Monte ( 1521-1603) and de Kerle ( 1531-1592). This motet is published in a collection of motets in Napels in 1595: Cantus, Philippi Rogerii, Invicitissmi Philippi Hispaniarum Regis, etc. Chori Musici Praefecti Sacrarum Modulationemum, Quas Vulgo , Liber Primus Neapoli. MDXCV.
Author:Wim Goossens
Text:
Delicta iuventutis meae, et ignorantias meas, ne memineris.
Secundum misericordiam tuam, memento mei tu propter bonitatem Domine.

Translation:
The sins of my youth and my frailties remember not;
In your kindness remember me, because of your goodness, O Lord.
Contributor:Wim Goossens