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Orlando di Lassus
1532 - 1594
Belgium / The Netherlands
Picture
O. di Lassus
Orlando di Lassus -also: Orlando di Lasso, Orlandus Lassus, Roland de Lasso, Orlande de Lassus, Roland de Lasso, Orlande de Lassus, Orlandus Lassus- (1532 - 14/06/1594), born in Mons (Bergen). He belonged to the Franco-Flemish school of composers whose work was of supreme international importance in the 16th century. He was born at Mons, in Hainaut, in 1532, and as a boy entered the service of a member of the Gonzaga family, hereditary dukes of Mantua. Employment elsewhere in Italy and a stay in Antwerp was followed by a position in the musical establishment of Duke Albrecht V of Bavaria in Munich, where Lassus remained from 1556 until his death. With Palestrina and Vittoria, he is one of the most important composers of the period.
Requiem
Period:High Renaissance
Musical form:fragments
Text/libretto:Latin mass
This requiem is incomplete.
Author:Willem Elders
Source:Componisten van de Lage Landen and The new Grove dictionary of music and musicians
Contributor:Peter Vreugdenhil
Libera me, Domine, de morte aeterna
Period:High Renaissance
Musical form:Motet à 6 vocibus
Text/libretto:Latin from the Exsequiarum Ordo de Officium Defunctorum.
The Libera me Domine de morte is a motet from the Exsequiarum Ordo more specific a Responsorium sung during the final blessing of the coffin on its catafalque. This Libera me. (there are more (4) plain-chant variations known) is an old Responsorium out of the In Exsequis and sung in the part Absolutio super tulum and is published in the old Liber Usualis pages 1763 – 1771. The Libera me, Domine, de morte aeterna is written in a imitative polyphonic counterpoint for six voices (SAATTB). In this work Lassus uses an old version of the Respond and uses some extra flats, in not using the whole text of this Respond. In following the text quando caeli movendo Lassus uses ascending notes. Remarkable and moving the Tenor II is nine times singing in a descending line through the whole Respond Respice finem! Look to the End!
Author:Wim Goossens
Circumdederunt me doloris mortis
Period:High Renaissance
Musical form:Motet a 6 vocibus
Text/libretto:Latin from Officium Defunctorum
Duration:2'50''
Label(s):AM 1242
This Antiphon is used in the Officium Defunctorum ad Matutinum and set by Lassus for six voices (SAATBB). In that time this motet was used too in the Office of the Dead ( see for instance Morales, Fernandez). This motet is written in polyphonic imitative style. It is written by Lassus as an inventory antiphon (Motet) at Matins of the Dead or at the Office of the Dead. Look to the very low Bass part. It’s interesting to see Lassus uses syncopations Bars 28-30 in Cantus and Altus giving accent to conturbaverunt troubled me! This setting by Lassus was posthumously printed in Cantiones sacrae sex vocibus ab Orlando et Rudolpho Lasso Munich, 1601 and some later in Magnum opus Musicum Munich, 1604.
Author:Wim Goossens
Text:
Circumdederunt me dolores mortis et torrentes iniquitatis conturbaverunt me. Dolores inferni circumdederunt me praeoccupaverunt me laquei mortis.
The anguish of death surrounds me; and the floods of ungodly men troubled me. The pains of hell are around me, and the snares of death prevented me.
Contributor:Wim Goossens
Scio enim quod Redemptor
Period:High Renaissance
Musical form:Motet a 4 vocibus
Text/libretto:Latin from a Responsorium de Officium Defunctorum
Duration:4'08''
Label(s):EAN/UPC 4017563116525
The text from this responsorium is taken out of sentences of Lectio VIII (Pelli meae) out of the Officium Defunctorum Ad Matutinum. The Scio enim quod Redemptor is an old Responsorium. There are about 138 Responsoria de Officium Defunctorum, Responds from Office of the Dead known and used during centuries in the Office of the Dead. They are all well ordered, this is number 85. This small Respond is written by Lassus for 4 voices (SATB). Lassus uses polyphonic imitative style, the last part of this Respond is homophonic.
Author:Wim Goossens
Text:
Scio enim quod Redemptor meus vivit, et in novissimo die de terra surrecturus sum; et rursum circumdabor pelle mea, et in carne mea videbo Deum Salvatorem meum.
For I know that my Redeemer liveth; and in the last day I shall rise out of the earth. And I shall be clothed again with my skin, and in my flesh I shall see my God.
Contributor:Wim Goossens
Peccata mea, Domine
Period:High Renaissance
Composed in:1553c
Musical form:Motet à 5 vocibus
Text/libretto:Latin from a Responsorium de Officium Defunctorum
This ‘Peccata mea, Domine’ is an old Responsorium. There are about 138 Responsoria de Officium Defunctorum, Responds from Office of the Dead known and used during centuries in the Office of the Dead. They are all well ordered, this is number 109. They vary per region in Europe. This motet starts with the theme in the Soprano following by the other voices from above to the bottom-line Tenor I, Tenor III, Tenor II and Bass and is written in imitative polyphonic style. Lassus uses flats and sharps. This motet is published in Sacrae cantiones quinque vocum ( Munich,1582) and in Liber quintus ecclesiasticarum cantionum quinque vocum vulgo moteta vocant, tam ex Veteri quam ex Novo Testamento, ab optimis quibusque huius aetatis musicis compositarum omnes primi toni antea nunquam excusus (Antwerp: Susato,1553). This respond is written for five voices (STTTB) and contains 64 bars. Lassus did not use the text of the belonging Versicle ‘Quoniam iniquitatem’.
Author:Wim Goossens
Text: Peccata mea, Domine:
Peccata mea domine sicut sagittae infixa sunt in me sed antequam vulnera generent in me sana me domine medicamento paenitentiae deus.

Translation:
My sins, O Lord, are fixed in me, like arrows, but before they caused wounds in me, heal me, O God, with the medicine of repentance.
Contributor:Wim Goossens
Peccantem me quotidie
Period:High Renaissance
Composed in:1555c
Musical form:Motet à 4 vocibus
Text/libretto:Latin from a Responsorium de Officium Defunctorum
Duration:3'48''
Label(s):CON 230
Written in Antwerp. The sentiment of penitence is expressed with a singular intensity in the two motets on texts from the Office of the dead: Peccantem me quotidie and Domine quando veneris. The appearance of such works so early in his career seems to show that in spite of the dissipations of the brillant court life to which he had been acccustomed and with the keen appreciation of the humorous aspects of life which find expression in so much of his secular work, there was still a vain of deep religion in his nature which found sincere expression in his church music.
Source:Grove's dictionary of music and musicians
Peccantem me quotidie is a motet from the Responsorium de Officium Defunctorum Ad Matutinum composed by Lassus for five voices (SATB). The Peccantem me quotidie is an old Responsorium, Respond and still published in the old Liber Usualis page 1797 and is sung after Lectio VII de Officium Defunctorum Ad Matutinum. This motet first appeared in printed anthologies or manuscripts between 1555 and 1569. Lassus has written this short motet in polyphonic imitative style and ends the motet in G minor not using the B flat.
Author:Wim Goossens
Domine quando veneris
Period:High Renaissance
Composed in:1555c
Musical form:Motet à 4 vocibus
Text/libretto:Latin from a Responsorium de Officium Defunctorum
Duration:2'56''
Label(s):Apec 0809274137524
Written in Antwerp. The sentiment of penitence is expressed with a singular intensity in the two motets on texts from the Office of the dead: Peccantem me quotidie and Domine quando veneris. The appearance of such works so early in his career seems to show that in spite of the dissipations of the brillant court life to which he had been acccustomed and with the keen appreciation of the humorous aspects of life which find expression in so much of his secular work, there was still a vain of deep religion in his nature which found sincere expression in his church music.
Source:Grove's dictionary of music and musicians
This is a motet from Printed Anthologies and Manuscripts, 1555-1569. The printer Adam Berg issued the so-called "Four-Language Print" to 4 and 8 vocibus in Munich in 1573 among it this motet. Domine, quando veneris is a motet from the Responsorium de Officium Defunctorum Ad Matutinum composed by Lassus for four voices (SATB). The Domine, quando veneris is an old Responsorium, Respond and still published in the old Liber Usualis page 1787 and is sung after Lectio III Officium Defunctorum Ad Matutinum. This short Respond (59 bars) is written by Lassus for 4 voices (SATB). Lassus uses polyphonic imitative style and uses already some flats in this Respond and writes it in a more motion style.
Author:Wim Goossens
Heu mihi, Domine
Period:High Renaissance
Composed in:1556
Musical form:Motet à 5 vocibus
Text/libretto:Latin Responsorium ad Matutinum de Officium Defunctorum
A motet from the Responsorium de Officium Defunctorum Ad Matutinum. Responsory from Matins of the Dead written by Lassus for five voices (SATTB). The Responsorium Heu/ Hei mihi, Domine is still published in the old Liber Usualis page 1791. This setting by Lassus was published in ll primo libro de mottetti (sic) a cinque & a sei voci nuovamente posti in luce. In aniversa per Ioanne Latio.1556. Con privilegio de la M. Ces. per anni Quattro (Jan Laet, Antwerp, 1556). The Heu mihi, Domine is written by Lassus in a fluent modest polyphonic counterpoint, using some flats. For the text see Pedro de Cristo on this website
Author:Wim Goossens
The text of this motet:

Heu mihi Domine quia peccavi nimis, in vita mea:
quid faciam miser?
ubi fugiam nisi ad te Deus meus?
Miserere mei dum veneris in novissimo die.
Anima mea turbata est valde sed tu Domine succurre ei:
miserere mei dum veneris in novissimo die.

Translation:
Woe is me, Lord, for I have sinned greatly.
What shall become of me, wretch that I am;
where shall I flee, except to Thee, O Lord.
Have mercy on me when Thou shalt come on the last day.
My soul is greatly troubled but Thou, O Lord, sustainest me:
have mercy on me when Thou shalt come on the last day.
Contributor:Wim Goossens
Ad te, Domine, levavi
Period:High Renaissance
Composed in:1556c
Musical form:Motet à 5 vocibus
Text/libretto:Latin Responsorium ad Matutinum de Officium Defunctorum
Duration:2'44''
This Ad te, Domine, levavi is a motet from the Responsorium de Officium Defunctorum Ad Matutinum composed by Lassus for five voices (SSATB). The Ad te, Domine, levavi is an old Responsorium. There are about 138 Responsoria de Officium Defunctorum, Responds from Office of the Dead known and used during centuries in the Office of the Dead. They are all well ordered, this is number 102. There after Lassus uses the second verse of Psalm 24 which even is used in the Office of the Dead, Officium Defunctorum Ad Matutinum in secundo Nocturno, see Liber Usualis page 1788. The setting by Lassus was published in “di Orlando di Lassus, ll primo libro de mottetti a cinque & a sei voci nuovamente posti in luce. In aniversa per Ioanne Latio.1556. Con privilegio de la M. Ces. per anni Quattro” (Jan Laet, Antwerp, 1556). This Responsorium is written in a fluent modest polyphonic counterpoint, without using extra flats.
Author:Wim Goossens
Text:
Ad te domine levavi animam meam Deus meus in te confido non erubescam. Neque irrideant me inimici mei etenim universi qui sustinent te non confundentur.

Translation:
To thee, O lord, I have lifted up my soul. O my God, I trust in thee. Let me not be ashamed, let not mine enemies triumph over me. Yea, let none that wait on thee be ashamed.
Contributor:Wim Goossens
Peccavi, quid faciam tibi
Period:High Renaissance
Composed in:1556c
Musical form:Motet a 5 vocibus
Text/libretto:Latin out of de Officium Defunctorum
This is a motet from the Officium Defunctorum ad Matutinum composed for six voices (SSATTB) by Orkandi di Lasus. Lassus uses part of the text of the first Lesson – lectio I – out of the Office of the Dead, the first nocturn which is published in the Liber Usualis at page 1785. The writing of this motet is of imitative type with the voices entering the ones after the others. This motet is written for five voices (SATTB) in modest imitative polyphonic style. In nearly each new part of a sentence the voices following each other. There is some minimum use of flats and sharps by Lassus. This motet contains 77 bars. This motet is published in a collection of motets in Antwerp 1556: DI ORLANDI DI LASSVS, ll primo libro de mottetti a cinque & a sei voci nuovamente posti in luce. IN ANVERSA. per Ioanne Latio.1556. Con privilegio de la M. Ces. per anni Quattro.
Author:Wim Goossens
Text:
Peccavi, quid faciam tibi, O custos hominum?
Quare me posuisti contrarium tibi,
Et factus sum mihi met ipsi gravis?
Cur non tollis, peccatum meum,
Et quare non aufers iniquitatem meam?
Ecce nunc in pulvere dormiam,
Et si mane me quaesieris, non subsistam.

Translation:
Though I have sinned, what can I do to you,
O watcher of men?
Why have you set me up as an object of attack,
or why should I be a burden to you?
Why do you not pardon my offence
Or take away my guilt?
For soon I shall lie down in the dust;
And should you seek me I shall then be gone.
Contributor:Wim Goossens
Vias tuas
Period:High Renaissance
Composed in:1556c
Musical form:Motet a 5 vocibus
Text/libretto:Latin out of Officium Defunctorum
Vias tuas is a motet from the Officium Defunctorum Ad Matutinum composed by Lassus for five voices (SSTTB). This Vias tuas is part of a psalm text (Psalm 24) and is used in the Office Defunctorum in secundo nocturno, second Nocturn. This version is published in the old Liber Usualis page 1788- 1789. Lassus uses only the verses 4 and 5. This motet starts with the theme in the Bass following by the other voices from the bottom-line Bass to above Tenor II, Tenor I, Soprano II and Soprano I. in modest imitative polyphonic style. A same climbing and following line is seen in “demonstra mihi” and “et semitas tuas”. Lassus uses flats and chromatic harmonies. Lassus underlines the text “Derige me in veritate” especially in the three upper voices in the same following way. “Et doce me” is underlined with homophonic phrases in two groups of voices first in Tenor together Soprano I,II and some later Tenor I, II together with Bass. This work belongs to the young Lassus. The writing of this motet is of imitative type with the voices entering the ones after the others. This motet is published in a collection of motets in Antwerp 1556: DI ORLANDI DI LASSVS, ll primo libro de mottetti a cinque & a sei voci nuovamente posti in luce. IN ANVERSA. per Ioanne Latio.1556. Con privilegio de la M. Ces. per anni Quattro.
Author:Wim Goossens
Text:
Vias tuas Domine demonstra mihi et; semitas tuas doce me,
Dirige me in veritate tua et doce me, quia tu es Deus salvator meus.

Translation:
Show, O Lord, thy ways to me, and teach me thy paths.
Direct me in thy truth, and teach me; for thou art God my Saviour.
Contributor:Wim Goossens
Sacrae Lectiones
Period:High Renaissance
Composed in:1560
Musical form:motet à 4 vocibus
Text/libretto:Latin Officium defunctorum
These Sacrae Lectiones novem ex Propheta Iob, quator vocum, in officiis Defunctorum 1560, contain:
Lectio prima:
Parce mihi Domine,
Lectio secunda
Taedet animam meam vitae meae,
Lectio tertia
Manus tuae Domine fecerunt me,
Lectio quarta
Responde mihi,
Lectio quinta
Homo natus de muliere,
Lectio sexta
Quis mihi hoc tribuat,
Lectio septima
Spiritus meus attenuabitur,
Lectio octava
Pelli meae,
Lectio nona
Quare de vulva eduxisti me?
Author:Wim Goossens
The two collected Lessons, Lectiones sacrae (see below) and Sacrae Lectiones composed by Lassus in motet-form are two Motet cycles each of which consists out of the nine Lectiones from the Book Job that appear in the Officium Defunctorum ad Matitutinum translated Matins of the Office for the Dead which have been published in the old Liber Usualis, on pages 1782 -1799. These nine Lectiones were full part of the Office for the Dead from the eleventh Century until the Second Vatican Council in 1965 were substantial revisions and alterations of the total Office in the Catholic Church have been made. This Office for the Dead more specific these Lectiones would be read Ad Matutinum in the morning prior to a Requiem Mass and the Burial. All nine Lessons in the Service were normally followed by a Responsorium. Lassus is as far as I know the first composer who set all nine Lectiones in one composition together. Sacrae Lectiones ex Propheta Iob I have been published in 1560. Lectiones sacrae novem ex libris Hiob excerptae II have been published in 1582, but considering the style they must have been composed around 1560. On the other hand most authorities agree the Lectionens II have been composed around 1580 shortly before the first publication by Berg in Munich in 1582. All Lectiones have been composed for 4 voices: Discantus, Altus, Tenor, Bassus.
The motets of Lectiones II are much shorter compared with those of Lectiones I. The Discantus is always the leading voice. The music has written in the service of expression of the text, therefore written for the greater part in homophone style.
Author:Wim Goossens
Taedet animam meam
Period:High Renaissance
Composed in:1562c
Musical form:Motet à 5 vocibus
Text/libretto:Latin from the Lectio II Officium Defunctorum
This motet is written in Munich. The sentiment of penitence is expressed in this motet on texts from the Lectio secunda de Officium Defunctorum ad Matutinum, second Lesson at Matins of Office of the Dead. Taedet anima meam is published in 1562 in Nuremberg in Sacrae Cantiones quinque vocum. Contrary to the motets with the same text found in Sacrae Lectiones and Lectiones sacrae novem this motet is written for five voices (SAATB). Lassus uses only the first two sentences of the second Lesson in this splendid early contemplative work. It is written in powerful and anguished polyphonic counterpoint. In this work Lassus uses extra flats.
Author:Wim Goossens
Text:
Taedet animam meam vitae meam dimittam adversum me eloquium meum. Loquar in amaritudine animae meae. Dicam Deo, noli me condemnare.
My soul is wear of my life; I shall leave my words to speak against me, and speak in the bitterness in my soul. I will say to God: Do not condemn me.
Contributor:Wim Goossens
Caligaverunt oculi mei
Period:High Renaissance
Composed in:1562c
Musical form:Motet à 5 vocibus
Text/libretto:Latin from a Responsorium de Officium Defunctorum
This motet is written in Munich. It is a motet from the Responsorium de Officium Defunctorum ad Matutinum composed for five voices (SAATB). The Caligaverunt oculi mei is an old Responsorium. There are about 138 Responsoria de Officium Defunctorum, Responds from Office of the Dead known and used during centuries in the Office of the Dead. They are all well ordered, this is number 9. This setting by Lassus was published in 1562 Nuremberg in Sacrae Cantiones quinque vocum. Lassus uses an old version of the Respond in this splendid early contemplative work. It is written in powerful and anguished imitative polyphonic counterpoint. In this work Lassus often uses extra flats.
Author:Wim Goossens
Text:
Caligaverunt oculi mei a fletu meo quia elongatus est a me qui consolabatur me: videte omnes populi si est dolor similis sicut dolor meus.
My eyes have grown dim with weeping; for he that consoled me is far from me. Behold, all ye people, if there is any sorrow like unto my sorrow.
Contributor:Wim Goossens
Domine, quando veneris
Period:High Renaissance
Composed in:1568c
Musical form:Motet à 5 vocibus
Text/libretto:Latin from a Responsorium de Officium Defunctorum
Duration:3'49''
Label(s):ASIN B00005QHT8
Lassus has written two Motets on the Respond Domine, quando veneris one for four voices and one for five voices. Domine, quando veneris is a motet from the Responsorium de Officium Defunctorum Ad Matutinum composed by Lassus for five voices (SATTB). The Domine, quando veneris is an old Responsorium, Respond and still published in the old Liber Usualis page 1787 and is sung after Lectio III in the Officium Defunctorum ad Matutinum, Office of the Dead at Matins. This motet for five voices was published by: Petri Ioannelli de Gandino Bergomensis summo studio ac labore collectae, eiusque expensis impressae. Venetiis Apud Antonium Gardanum 1568 a quinque voces (Venice).
Author:Wim Goossens
Cognoscimus, Domine
Period:High Renaissance
Composed in:1569c
Musical form:Motet à 5 vocibus
Text/libretto:Latin from a Responsorium de Officium Defunctorum
This ‘Cognoscimus Domine’ is an old Responsorium. There are about 138 Responsoria de Officium Defunctorum, Responds from Office of the Dead known and used during centuries in the Office of the Dead. They are all well ordered, this is number 10. The second part, pars secundo of this motet is “Vita nostra” the versicle following this Respond. The Versicle “Vita nostra” nr 240 is used in the Office of the dead. But in this version not used by Lassus. It is certain he wrote a Vita nostra and it is separately published under number 330 in book VII (S&H) after the ‘Cognoscimus’. This motet starts with the theme in the Soprano following by the other voices from above to the bottom-line Tenor I, Tenor II, Tenor III and Bass. The motet has rich imitative polyphonic style. Lassus uses lots of flats and sharps to express his mourning feelings. This motet is written for five parts (STTTB) and look at the low voices Lassus has used in this motet. This motet was originally published by Berg Munich/Nuremberg in 1569 in Cantiones aliquot quinque vocum. There is a unconfirmed source stating this motet was written in 1564. The motet contains 57 bars.
Author:Wim Goossens
Text: Cognoscimus and Vita Nostra
Cognoscimus domine quia peccavimus veniam petimus quam non meremur manum tuam porrige lapsis qui latroni confitenti paradisi januas aperuisti.
V. Vita nostra in dolore suspirat et in opera non emendta; si expectas, non corrigimur, aut si vindicas, non duramus.
Contributor:Wim Goossens
Vita Nostra
Period:High Renaissance
Composed in:1569c
Musical form:Motet à 5 vocibus
Text/libretto:Latin from a Responsorium de Officium Defunctorum
This ‘Vita Nostra’ is the Versicle number 240 used in the office of the dead and mentioned here above under ‘Cognoscimus Domine’ a Respond of Office of the Dead and is normally in the service sung after the Respond. The motet is published under number 330 in Book VII (S&H) after the ‘Cognoscimus’. This motet starts with the theme in the Soprano following by the other voices from above to the bottom-line Tenor I, Tenor III, Tenor II and Bass. The motet has a rich imitative polyphonic style and is written in a more lively style, see the beginning of this motet bars 1 up to 7, which is continued in bars 34 up to 50. Lassus uses flats and sharps to express his mourning feelings. This motet is written for five parts (STTTB) and look at the low voices Lassus has used in this motet. This motet was originally published by Berg Munich/Nuremberg in 1569 in Cantiones aliquot quinque vocum. The motet contains 52 bars. Lassus did not repeat a part of the belonging Respond, like for instance Lechner (1553-1606) did, which is usual in that times. My opinion is that you can use and sing the two motets separately.
Author:Wim Goossens
Text: Cognoscimus and Vita Nostra
Cognoscimus domine quia peccavimus veniam petimus quam non meremur manum tuam porrige lapsis qui latroni confitenti paradisi januas aperuisti.
V. Vita nostra in dolore suspirat et in opera non emendta; si expectas, non corrigimur, aut si vindicas, non duramus.
Contributor:Wim Goossens
Si bona suscepimus
Period:High Renaissance
Composed in:1571c
Musical form:Motet a 5 vocibus
Text/libretto:Latin from a Responsorium de Officium Defunctorum
Label(s):Astree 7780
AST 8872
This motet ‘Si bona suscepimus’ is an old Responsorium. There are about 138 Responsoria de Officium Defunctorum, Responds from Office of the Dead known and used during centuries in the Office of the Dead. They are all well ordered, this is number 87. One of the two corresponding Versicle from the Office of the Dead “ Nudus egressus” number 156 is even used by Lassus. The use of Responds and Versicles of The Office of the Dead vary per region all over Europe. This long Respond with Versicle is written by Lassus for 5 voices (SAATB). In general the text is coming out of the Book Job. It starts with imitative polyphony with the voices entering the ones after the others, Tenor, Bassus, Altus II, Soprano and Altus I. As mentioned with other motets Lassus uses flats and sharps to express his feelings. But very special he gives extra homophonic accents with the wording ‘Dominus’, Lord. It starts with one voice while the others in homophony answers with full character and long notes ‘Dominus’ ( bars 35, 38, 84 and 88). It’s interesting to hear and see it, even the following bars three voices imitative repeating each other in ‘dedit’ and ‘abstulit’ ( with the notes quarters : do, re, mi, fa, sol eights in singing)! Lassus understands the wording and gave them sophisticated accents! The Versicle starts in bar 61 with Altus II and ends with bar 84. Due to normal practice the Respond-text will come back in from bar 84 with the mentioned imposing Dominus! This means that this motet is written for use in the services. Lassus uses polyphonic imitative style. It’s remarkable Lassus ends this mourning motet in full A. This motet is published in Moduli quinis vocibus nunquam hactenus editi (Paris, 1571).
Author:Wim Goossens
Text:
Si bona suscepimus de manu domine, mala autem quare non sustineamus?
Dominus dedit dominus abstulit sicut domino placuit ita factum est. Sit nomen domini benedictum.
V. Nudus egressus sum de utero matris meae, nudus revertar illuc.
R. Dominus dedit dominus abstulit sicut domino placuit ita factum est. Sit nomen domini benedictum.

Translation:
If we have received good things at the hand of God, why should we not endure evil?
The Lord has given, and the Lord has taken away: as it has pleased the Lord, so is it done: blessed be the name of the Lord.
V. Naked came I out of my mother’s womb, and naked shall I return thither.
R. The Lord has given, and the Lord has taken away: as it has pleased the Lord, so is it done: blessed be the name of the Lord.
Contributor:Wim Goossens
Domine, secundum actum meum
Period:High Renaissance
Composed in:1573
Musical form:Motet à 4 vocibus
Text/libretto:Latin from a Responsorium de Officium Defunctorum
Duration:3'36''
Label(s):Tho 2209
Domine, secundum actum meum is a motet from the Responsorium de Officium Defunctorum Ad Matutinum composed by Lassus for four voices (SATB). The Domine, secundum actum meum is an old Responsorium, Respond and still published in the old Liber Usualis page 1798 and is sung after Lectio VIII. The printer Adam Berg issued the so-called "Four-Language Print" to 4 and 8 vocibus in Munich in 1573 among it this motet. The Domine, secundum actum meum is written in a modest imitative polyphonic counterpoint. In this work Lassus uses an old version of the Respond and uses some extra flats in giving extra accents.
Author:Wim Goossens
Text:
Domine secundum actum meum noli me iudicare nihil dignum in conspectu tuo egi ideo deprecor maiestatem tuam ut tu Deus deleas iniquitatem meam.
Lord do not judge me after my deeds; I have done nothing worthy in your eyes. Therefore I beseech You in Your majesty to deliver me from my sins.
Contributor:Wim Goossens
Missa pro defunctis
Period:High Renaissance
Composed in:1578
Musical form:mass à 4
Text/libretto:Latin mass
Label(s):Hyperion 22012
Hyperion CDA 66321/2
Signum Classics SIGCD 076
Missa pro defunctis cum quatuor vocibus (1578) contains:
- Introïtus: Requiem aeternam
- Kyrie
- Graduale: Si ambulem
- Offertorium: Domine Jesu Christe
- Sancus
- Benedictis
- Agnus Dei
- Communio: Lux Aeterna
- In Paradisum: Uni sono
Source:http://www.naxos.com/composer/lassus.htm
Contributor:Wim Goossens
Missa pro defunctis
Period:High Renaissance
Composed in:1580c
Musical form:mass à 5
Text/libretto:Latin mass
Duration:35'03''
Label(s):Deutsche Harmonia Mundi 77066
This requiem for 5 voices, printed in Patrocinium musices in 1589. The composition is of older date, for it is found in manuscripts of 1578/1580.
Source:Grove's dictionary of music and musicians
Requiem à 5 vocibus (1580) contains:
- Introïtus: Requiem aeternam
- Kyrie
- Tractus: Absolve Domine
- Offertorium: Domine Jesu Christe
- Sanctus
- Benedictis
- Agnus Dei
- Communio: Lux Aeterna
Author:Wim Goossens
Lectiones sacrae
Period:High Renaissance
Composed in:1580c
Musical form:motet à 4 vocibus
Text/libretto:Latin Officium defunctorum
These Lectiones Sacrae contain:
Lectio prima:
Parce mihi Domine,
Lectio secunda
Taedet animam meam vitae meae,
Lectio tertia
Manus tuae Domine fecerunt me,
Lectio quarta
Responde mihi,
Lectio quinta
Homo natus de muliere,
Lectio sexta
Quis mihi hoc tribuat,
Lectio septima
Spiritus meus attenuabitur,
Lectio octava
Pelli meae,
Lectio nona
Quare de vulva eduxisti me?
Author:Wim Goossens
The two collected Lessons, Lectiones sacrae and Sacrae Lectiones (see above) composed by Lassus in motet-form are two Motet cycles each of which consists out of the nine Lectiones from the Book Job that appear in the Officium Defunctorum ad Matitutinum translated Matins of the Office for the Dead which have been published in the old Liber Usualis, on pages 1782 -1799. These nine Lectiones were full part of the Office for the Dead from the eleventh Century until the Second Vatican Council in 1965 were substantial revisions and alterations of the total Office in the Catholic Church have been made. This Office for the Dead more specific these Lectiones would be read Ad Matutinum in the morning prior to a Requiem Mass and the Burial. All nine Lessons in the Service were normally followed by a Responsorium. Lassus is as far as I know the first composer who set all nine Lectiones in one composition together. Sacrae Lectiones ex Propheta Iob I have been published in 1560. Lectiones sacrae novem ex libris Hiob excerptae II have been published in 1582, but considering the style they must have been composed around 1560. On the other hand most authorities agree the Lectionens II have been composed around 1580 shortly before the first publication by Berg in Munich in 1582. All Lectiones have been composed for 4 voices: Discantus, Altus, Tenor, Bassus.
The motets of Lectiones II are much shorter compared with those of Lectiones I. The Discantus is always the leading voice. The music has written in the service of expression of the text, therefore written for the greater part in homophone style.
Author:Wim Goossens
Missa pro defunctis
Period:High Renaissance
Composed in:1588c
Musical form:motet à 4 vocibus
Text/libretto:Latin from Missae pro defunctis
This might be the same piece as the above mentioned incomplete Requiem.
In the manuscript of Altötting 1588 is found as far as known the only surviving part of an incomplete Requiem Mass of Orlando di Lasso. Survived is an organ score of a Requiem work which is otherwise totally vanished. Reconstructing is on the way by Michael Procter who refers in doing so to the new Complete Works Bärenreiter Edition, volume 12, Band 12: Messen 64-70: Handschriftlich überlieferte Messen IV. Fragmente. Modelle. Register. Herausgegeben von Siegfried Hermelink, 1975. LIX + 352 S. At this stage it is uncertain whether this is the Requiem mend by Willem Elders p.153, Componisten van de Lage Landen, Composers of the Low Countries, and published before on this web-site. I suppose so. The published and reconstructed movement of this Requiem Mass is the Sanctus and is written by Lassus for 4 voices (SATB). This movement consists out of 84 bars. This setting compared to the other Requiem Masses (for four voices c.1578 and five voices c.1580) is very simple. It’s polyphonic, some short motives being repeated by more voices. The superior has long notes in partial quoting the plain-chant. The suggestion by Procter is made this Missa pro Defunctis was intended as an “in memoriam Mass” rather than as a “Requiem”. This Missa pro Defunctis could not reach the level compared to the mentioned superior Lassus Requiems. Even the date of composing is uncertain. This manuscript is published in MS Altötting 1588.
Author:Wim Goossens
Source:Edition Michael Procter 2000